Roger Quilter


Composer: Roger Cuthbert Quilter
Date of Birth: 01 November 1877
Date of Death: 21 September 1953
Nationality: English
Period/Era/Style: 20th Century
Contribution(s): Quilter was an English composer, known particularly for his songs. Born at Hove, Sussex (a commemorative blue plaque is on the house at 4 Brunswick Square), Quilter was a younger son of Sir William Quilter, 1st Baronet, a wealthy noted landowner, politician and art collector.

Biography: Roger Quilter was educated first in the preparatory school at Farnborough. He then moved to Eton College and later became a fellow-student of Percy Grainger, Cyril Scott and H. Balfour Gardiner at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt, where he studied for almost five years under the guidance of the German professor of composition Iwan Knorr. Quilter belonged to the Frankfurt Group, a circle of composers who studied at the Hoch Conservatory in the late 1890s. His reputation in England rests largely on his songs and on his light music for orchestra, such as his Children’s Overture, with its interwoven nursery rhyme tunes, and a suite of music for the play Where the Rainbow Ends. He is noted as an influence on several English composers, including Peter Warlock.

In November 1936, Quilter’s opera Julia was presented at Covent Garden by the British Music Drama Opera Company under the direction of Vladimir Rosing.

Quilter enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with the tenor Gervase Elwes until the latter’s death in 1921. As a homosexual, he found it difficult to cope with some of the pressures which he felt were imposed upon him, and eventually deteriorated into mental illness after the loss of his nephew Arnold Guy Vivian during the Second World War.

He died at his home in St John’s Wood, London, a few months after celebrations to mark his 75th birthday, and was buried in the family vault at St Mary’s Church, Bawdsey, Suffolk.

Songs

Roger Quilter’s output of songs, more than one hundred in total, added to the canon of English art song that is still sung today. Among the most popular are “Love’s Philosophy”, “Fair House of Joy”, “Come Away Death”, “Go, Lovely Rose”, “Weep You No More”, “By the Sea”, and his setting of “O Mistress Mine”. Quilter’s setting of verses from the Tennyson poem “Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal” is one of his earliest songs but is nonetheless characteristic of the later, mature style.

He also published the Arnold Book of Old Songs, a collection of 16 folk and traditional songs to new accompaniments, dedicated to his nephew Arnold Guy Vivian.


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Roger Quilter (Nov. 01, 1877 – Sep. 21, 1953) – English, 20th century composer
Quilter was an English composer, known particularly for his songs. Born at Hove, Sussex (a commemorative blue plaque is on the house at 4 Brunswick Square), Quilter was a younger son of Sir William Quilter, 1st Baronet, a wealthy noted landowner, politician and art collector.
#rogerquilter #englishcomposer #20thcenturycomposer #songcomposer #maestro68dotcom

 

Niccolò Paganini


Composer: Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini
Date of Birth: 27 October 1782
Date of Death: 27 May 1840
Nationality: Italian
Occupation(s): violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer.
Period/Era/Style: Classical/Romantic transition
Contribution(s): Paganini was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer. He was the most celebrated violin virtuoso of his time, and left his mark as one of the pillars of modern violin technique. His 24 Caprices for Solo Violin Op. 1 are among the best known of his compositions, and have served as an inspiration for many prominent composers.

Biography:   Childhood |   Early career   |   Travelling virtuoso   |   Late career and health decline   |   Final years, death, and burial   |    Personal and professional relationships   |   Instruments   |   Compositions   |   Violin technique   |   Inspired works   |   Memorials   |   Fiorini daguerreotype   |   Dramatic portrayals


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Composer: Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini
Date of Birth: 27 October 1782
Date of Death: 27 May 1840
Nationality: Italian
Occupation(s): violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer.
Period/Era/Style: Classical era/Romantic transition
Contribution(s): Paganini was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer. He was the most celebrated violin virtuoso of his time, and left his mark as one of the pillars of modern violin technique. His 24 Caprices for Solo Violin Op. 1 are among the best known of his compositions, and have served as an inspiration for many prominent composers.


 

Domenico Scarlatti


Composer: Giuseppe Domenico Scarlatti (aka Domenico Scarlatti (DS), not to be confused by Giuseppe Scarlatti [GS] in which it is still uncertain whether GS was the nephew of Alessandro (AS) born 18 June 1723 or the nephew of Domenico (DS) born in 1718)
Date of Birth: 26 October 1685
Date of Death: 23 July 1757
Nationality: Italian
Period/Era/Style: Late Baroque / Classical Transition
Contribution(s): Scarlatti was an Italian composer. He is classified primarily as a Baroque composer chronologically, although his music was influential in the development of the Classical style and he was one of the few Baroque composers to transition into the classical period. Like his renowned father Alessandro Scarlatti, he composed in a variety of musical forms, although today he is known mainly for his 555 keyboard sonatas[1]. He spent much of his life in the service of the Portuguese and Spanish royal families.

Biography: Life and career: Domenico Scarlatti was born in Naples, Kingdom of Naples, belonging to the Spanish Crown, in 1685, the same year as Johann Sebastian Bach and George Frideric Handel. He was the sixth of ten children of the composer and teacher Alessandro Scarlatti. Domenico’s older brother Pietro Filippo was also a musician.

He probably first studied music under his father. Other composers who may have been his early teachers include Gaetano Greco, Francesco Gasparini, and Bernardo Pasquini, all of whom may have influenced his musical style. He was appointed as composer and organist at the royal chapel in Naples in 1701. In 1704, he revised Carlo Francesco Pollarolo’s opera Irene for performance at Naples. Soon afterwards, his father sent him to Venice. After this, nothing is known of Scarlatti’s life until 1709, when he went to Rome in the service of the exiled Polish queen Marie Casimire. He met Thomas Roseingrave there. Scarlatti was already an eminent harpsichordist: there is a story of a trial of skill with George Frideric Handel at the palace of Cardinal Ottoboni in Rome where he was judged possibly superior to Handel on that instrument, although inferior on the organ. Later in life, he was known to cross himself in veneration when speaking of Handel’s skill. In Rome, Scarlatti composed several operas for Queen Casimire’s private theatre. He was Maestro Di Cappella at St. Peter’s from 1715 to 1719. In 1719 he travelled to London to direct his opera Narciso at the King’s Theatre.

According to Vicente Bicchi (Papal Nuncio at the time), Domenico Scarlatti arrived in Lisbon on 29 November 1719. There he taught music to the Portuguese princess Maria Magdalena Barbara. He left Lisbon on 28 January 1727 for Rome, where he married Maria Caterina Gentili on 6 May 1728. In 1729 he moved to Seville, staying for four years. In 1733 he went to Madrid as music master to Princess Maria Barbara, who had married into the Spanish royal house. The Princess later became Queen of Spain. Scarlatti remained in the country for the remaining twenty-five years of his life, and had five children there. After the death of his first wife in 1742, he married a Spaniard, Anastasia Maxarti Ximenes. Among his compositions during his time in Madrid were a number of the 555 keyboard sonatas for which he is best known.

Scarlatti befriended the castrato singer Farinelli, a fellow Neapolitan also enjoying royal patronage in Madrid. The musicologist and harpsichordist Ralph Kirkpatrick commented that Farinelli’s correspondence provides “most of the direct information about Scarlatti that has transmitted itself to our day”. Domenico Scarlatti died in Madrid, at the age of 71. His residence on Calle Leganitos is designated with a historical plaque, and his descendants still live in Madrid. He was buried at a convent there, in Madrid, but his grave no longer exists.

Music: Only a small fraction of Scarlatti’s compositions were published during his lifetime; Scarlatti himself seems to have overseen the publication in 1738 of the most famous collection, his 30 Essercizi (“Exercises”). These were well received throughout Europe, and were championed by the foremost English writer on music of the eighteenth century, Charles Burney.

The many sonatas that were unpublished during Scarlatti’s lifetime have appeared in print irregularly in the two and a half centuries since. Scarlatti has attracted notable admirers, including Béla Bartók, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Johannes Brahms, Frédéric Chopin, Emil Gilels, Enrique Granados, Marc-André Hamelin, Vladimir Horowitz, Franz Liszt, Ivo Pogorelić, Heinrich Schenker and Dmitri Shostakovich.

Scarlatti’s 555 keyboard sonatas are single movements, mostly in binary form, and some in early sonata form, and mostly written for the harpsichord or the earliest pianofortes. (There are four for organ, and a few for small instrumental group). Some of them display harmonic audacity in their use of discords, and also unconventional modulations to remote keys.

Other distinctive attributes of Scarlatti’s style are the following:

  • The influence of Iberian (Portuguese and Spanish) folk music. An example is Scarlatti’s use of the Phrygian mode and other tonal inflections more or less alien to European art music. Many of Scarlatti’s figurations and dissonances are suggestive of the guitar.
  • A formal device in which each half of a sonata leads to a pivotal point, which Kirkpatrick termed “the crux”, and which is sometimes underlined by a pause or fermata. Before the crux, Scarlatti sonatas often contain their main thematic variety, and after the crux the music makes more use of repetitive figurations as it modulates away from the home key (in the first half) or back to the home key (in the second half).

Kirkpatrick produced an edition of the sonatas in 1953, and the numbering from this edition is now nearly always used – the Kk. or K. number. Previously, the numbering commonly used was from the 1906 edition compiled by the Neapolitan pianist Alessandro Longo (L. numbers). Kirkpatrick’s numbering is chronological, while Longo’s ordering is a result of his grouping the sonatas into “suites”. In 1967 the Italian musicologist Giorgio Pestelli published a revised catalog (using P. numbers), which corrected what he considered to be some anachronisms.

Aside from his many sonatas, Scarlatti composed a number of operas and cantatas, symphonias, and liturgical pieces. Well-known works include the Stabat Mater of 1715 and the Salve Regina of 1757, which is thought to be his last composition.


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Giuseppe Domenico Scarlatti (Oct. 26, 1685 – July 23, 1757) – Italian, Baroque / Classical Transition, composer of the Galante Style. Son of  Alessandro Scarlatti and younger brother of Pietro Filippo Scarlatti.
G. D. Scarlatti is classified primarily as a Baroque composer chronologically, although his music was influential in the development of the Classical style and he was one of the few Baroque composers to transition into the classical period. Like his renowned father Alessandro Scarlatti, he composed in a variety of musical forms, although today he is known mainly for his 555 keyboard sonatas. He spent much of his life in the service of the Portuguese and Spanish royal families.

#giuseppedomenicoscarlatti #domenicoscarlatti #italiancomposer #baroquecomposer #classicalcomposer #baroqueclassicaltransition #galantestylecomposer #keyboardsonata #maestro68dotcom


 

Georges Bizet

Composer: Georges Bizet, registered at birth as Alexandre César Léopold Bizet
Date of Birth: 25 October 1838
Date of Death: 3 June 1875
Nationality: French
Period/Era/Style: Middle Romantic-era
Contribution(s): Bizet registered at birth as Alexandre César Léopold Bizet, was a French composer of the romantic era. Best known for his operas in a career cut short by his early death, Bizet achieved few successes before his final work, Carmen, which has become one of the most popular and frequently performed works in the entire opera repertoire.

Biography: During a brilliant student career at the Conservatoire de Paris, Bizet won many prizes, including the prestigious Prix de Rome in 1857. He was recognised as an outstanding pianist, though he chose not to capitalise on this skill and rarely performed in public. Returning to Paris after almost three years in Italy, he found that the main Parisian opera theatres preferred the established classical repertoire to the works of newcomers. His keyboard and orchestral compositions were likewise largely ignored; as a result, his career stalled, and he earned his living mainly by arranging and transcribing the music of others. Restless for success, he began many theatrical projects during the 1860s, most of which were abandoned. Neither of his two operas that reached the stage in this time—Les pêcheurs de perles and La jolie fille de Perth—were immediately successful.

After the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–1871, during which Bizet served in the National Guard, he had little success with his one-act opera Djamileh, though an orchestral suite derived from his incidental music to Alphonse Daudet’s play L’Arlésienne was instantly popular. The production of Bizet’s final opera, Carmen, was delayed because of fears that its themes of betrayal and murder would offend audiences. After its premiere on 3 March 1875, Bizet was convinced that the work was a failure; he died of a heart attack three months later, unaware that it would prove a spectacular and enduring success.

Bizet’s marriage to Geneviève Halévy was intermittently happy and produced one son. After his death, his work, apart from Carmen, was generally neglected. Manuscripts were given away or lost, and published versions of his works were frequently revised and adapted by other hands. He founded no school and had no obvious disciples or successors. After years of neglect, his works began to be performed more frequently in the 20th century. Later commentators have acclaimed him as a composer of brilliance and originality whose premature death was a significant loss to French musical theatre.

More on Wikipedia:   Early years: Family background and childhood   |   Conservatoire   |   Rome, 1858–1860   |   Emergent composer   |   Paris, 1860–1863   |   Years of struggle   |   Marriage   |   War and upheaval   |   Late career   |   DjamilehL’Arlésienne and Don Rodrigue   |   Carmen   |   Illness and death


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Georges Bizet (Oct. 25 1838 – June 03, 1875) – French composer of the romantic era. Best known for his operas in a career cut short by his early death, Bizet achieved few successes before his final work, Carmen, which has become one of the most popular and frequently performed works in the entire opera repertoire.
French; Romantic-era
Notable Work(s): “Carmen”

#georgesbizet #frenchcomposer #romanticcomposer #carmenopera #maestro68dotcom

Johann Strauss II


Name: Johann Strauss II (Johann Baptist Strauss) aka Johann Strauss Jr., the Younger or the Son.
Date of Birth: October 25, 1825
Date of Death: June 3, 1899
Discipline/Occupation(s): Composer
Nationality: Austrian
Period/Era/Style: Middle Romantic era
Contribution(s): Johann Baptist Strauss, son of Johann Strauss I, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance musicand operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as “The Waltz King”, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.

Strauss had two younger brothers, Josef and Eduard Strauss, who became composers of light music as well, although they were never as well known as their elder brother. Some of Johann Strauss’s most famous works include “The Blue Danube”, “Kaiser-Walzer” (Emperor Waltz), “Tales from the Vienna Woods”, and the “Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka”. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

Biography: Spelling of name   |   Early life   |   Debut as a composer   |   Career advancements   |   Marriages   |   Musical rivals and admirers   |   Stage works   |   Death and legacy   |   Portrayals in the media   |   Works


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Johann Strauss II (Oct. 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899) – was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as “The Waltz King”, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
Austrian composer; Romantic era; son of Johann Strauss I; Eldest brother to Josef and Eduard Strauss
Notable Work(s): “The Blue Danube”, “Kaiser-Walzer” (Emperor Waltz), “Tales from the Vienna Woods”, and the “Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka”. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

#johannstraussii #johannstrausstheyounger #johannstraussjr #thewaltzking #thebluedanube #emperorwaltz #diefledermaus #maestro68dotcom

Ferdinand Hiller

Composer: Ferdinand (von) Hiller
Date of Birth: 24 October 1811
Date of Death: 11 May 1885
Nationality: German
Period/Era/Style: Early Romantic-era
Contribution(s): Hiller was a German composer, conductor, writer and music-director.

Biography: Ferdinand Hiller was born to a wealthy Jewish family in Frankfurt am Main, where his father Justus (originally Isaac Hildesheim, a name that he changed late in the 18th century to conceal his Jewish origins) was a merchant in English textiles – a business eventually continued by Ferdinand’s brother Joseph. Hiller’s talent was discovered early and he was taught piano by the leading Frankfurt musician Alois Schmitt, violin by Jörg Hofmann, and harmony and counterpoint by Georg Jacob Vollweiler; at 10 he performed a Mozart concerto in public; and two years later, he produced his first composition.

In 1822, the 13-year-old Felix Mendelssohn entered his life. The Mendelssohn family was at that time staying briefly in Frankfurt and the young Hiller visited them where he was immensely impressed by the playing of Felix (and even more so by that of his sister Fanny Mendelssohn). When their acquaintance was renewed in 1825 the two boys found an immediate close friendship, which was to last until 1843. Hiller tactfully describes their falling out as arising from “social, and not from personal susceptibilities.” But in fact it seems to have been more to do with Hiller’s succession to Mendelssohn as director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra in 1843.

From 1825 to 1827, Hiller was a pupil of Johann Nepomuk Hummel in Weimar; while he was with Hummel at Beethoven’s deathbed, Hiller secured a lock of Beethoven’s hair. This lock is now at the San Jose State University, after having been sold at Sotheby’s in 1994. While in Vienna for Beethoven’s obsequies, Hiller and Hummel heard Johann Michael Vogl and Franz Schubert perform Schubert’s Winterreise. Hiller wrote that his master was so moved that tears fell from his eyes.

From 1828 to 1835, Hiller based himself in Paris, where he was engaged as teacher of composition at Choron’s School of Music. He eventually gave up his position so that he might better equip himself as a pianist and composer. He spent time in Italy, hoping that this would assist him to write a successful opera (a hope which was never fulfilled). In 1836, he was in Frankfurt devoting himself to composition. His abilities were recognized, and although but 25, he was asked to act as conductor of the Cäcilienverein during the illness of its conductor Schelble.

In addition to Mendelssohn, he attracted the attention of Rossini who assisted him to launch his first opera, Romilda (which was a failure), at Milan. Mendelssohn obtained for Hiller an entrée to the Gewandhaus, and afforded an opportunity for the public presentation of Hiller’s oratorio Die Zerstörung Jerusalems (The Destruction of Jerusalem, 1840). After a year of study in Church music at Rome, Hiller returned to Leipzig, and during the season of 1843-44 conducted the Gewandhaus concerts. By this time his position in the musical world was established, and honors and appointments were showered upon him. In 1845 Robert Schumann dedicated to Hiller his piano concerto. Hiller became municipal kapellmeister of Düsseldorf in 1847, and in 1850 received a similar appointment at Cologne, where he founded Cologne Conservatoire that year and remained as Kapellmeister until 1884. During this time, he was twelve times festival director of the Lower Rhenish Music Festival, and conducted the Gürzenichconcerts. He worked in Dresden as well. Thus he played a leading part in Germany’s musical life. And he was conductor at the Italian Opera in Paris during the season of 1852-53.

During Hiller’s long reign in Cologne, which earned him a ‘von’ to precede his surname, his star pupil was Max Bruch, the composer of the cello elegy Kol Nidrei, based on the synagogue hymn sung at Yom Kippur. Bruch was not Jewish; his knowledge of the theme of Kol Nidrei came through Hiller, who introduced him to the Berlin chazan, Lichtenstein. Hiller’s regime at Cologne was strongly marked by his conservative tastes, which he attempted to prolong by recommending, as his successor in 1884, either Brahms or Bruch. The appointment went however to a “modernist”, Franz Wüllner, who, according to Grove “initiated his term […] with concerts of works by Wagner, Liszt and Richard Strauss, all of whom Hiller had avoided.” 

Hiller was elected a member of the Prussian Academy of Arts in 1849, and in 1868 received the title of doctor from the University of Bonn. He died in Cologne.

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Franz Liszt*

Liszt in March 1886, four months before his death, photographed by Nadar

Name: Franz Liszt
Date of Birth: October 22, 1811
Date of Death: July 31, 1886
Discipline/Occupation(s): composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary
Nationality: 🇭🇺 Hungarian
Period/Era/Style: Early Romantic-era / 19th Century
Contribution(s): Liszt was a prolific 19th-century (romantic era) Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary. Liszt gained renown in Europe during the early nineteenth century for his prodigious virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was a friend, musical promoter and benefactor to many composers of his time, including Frédéric Chopin, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg, Ole Bull, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka, and Alexander Borodin.

As a composer, Liszt was one of the most prominent representatives of the New German School (Neudeutsche Schule). He left behind an extensive and diverse body of work in which he influenced his forward-looking contemporaries and anticipated many 20th-century ideas and trends. Some of his most notable musical contributions were the invention of the symphonic poem, developing the concept of thematic transformation as part of his experiments in musical form, and making radical departures in harmony.

More info from Wikipedia:  Biography: Life: Early life   |   Adolescence in Paris   |   Paganini   |   With Countess Marie d’Agoult   |   Touring Europe   |   Liszt in Weimar   |   Rome, Weimar, Budapest   |   Royal Academy of Music at Budapest   |   Last years

Liszt as a pianist: Performing style   |   Repertoire

Musical works: Piano music   |   Transcriptions   |   Organ music   |   Lieder   |   Programme music   |   Symphonic poems   |   Late works

Legacy: Liszt’s students: Early students   |   Later students   |   Liszt’s teaching approach   |   Film portrayals


Playlist:

  • Liebestraum
  • Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
  • La Campanella
  • Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 – orchestrated
  • Album: The Great Piano Works – Part I
    • Hungarian Rhapsodies (19), S.244/1-19
    • Années de pèlerinage I, S.160
  • Album: The Great Piano Works – Part II
    • Années de pèlerinage II, S.161
    • Piano Sonata in B Minor, S.178
    • Soirées de Vienne, S.427: VI. Allegro con strepito in A Minor
    • En rêve, S.207
    • Mephisto Waltz No. 3, S.216
    • Bagatelle sans tonalité, S.216a
    • Trübe Wolken, S.199
    • Études d’exécution transcendante (12), S.139
  • Complete (13) symphonic poems
  • Album: Piano Concertos &
    • Piano Concerto No. 1
    • Piano Concerto No. 2
    • Totentanz, S. 525
  • Piano Concerto No. 3 in E-flat major Op. posth. S.125a

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Summery:

Franz Liszt* (Oct. 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary
🇭🇺 Hungarian; Early Romantic-era / 19th Century
Liszt was a prolific 19th-century (romantic era) Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary. Liszt gained renown in Europe during the early nineteenth century for his prodigious virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was a friend, musical promoter and benefactor to many composers of his time, including Frédéric Chopin, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg, Ole Bull, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka, and Alexander Borodin.

#franzliszt #liszt #hungariancomposer #romanticcomposer #greatcomposers #maestro68dotcom


Charles Ives


Name: Charles Edward Ives
Date of Birth: October 20, 1874
Date of Death: May 19, 1954
Discipline/Occupation(s): Composer
Nationality: American
Period/Era/Style: Romantic/20th Century – Modernism
Contribution(s): Ives was an American modernist composer. He is one of the first American composers of international renown, though his music was largely ignored during his life, and many of his works went unperformed for many years. Over time, he came to be regarded as an “American original”. He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.

Sources of Ives’ tonal imagery are hymn tunes and traditional songs, the town band at holiday parade, the fiddlers at Saturday night dances, patriotic songs, sentimental parlor ballads, and the melodies of Stephen Foster.

Biography: Biography   |   Reception   |   Compositions   |   Politics


Playlist

  • Symphony No. 1 in D minor (1898-1902)
  • Symphony No. 2 (1897-1902, revised 1910)
  • Symphony No. 3: The Camp Meeting (1901-1904, rev. 1911)
  • Symphony No. 4 (1916)
  • A Symphony: New England Holidays (1919)
  • Universe Symphony (completed by L. Austin)
  • The Unanswered Question (1908, rev. 1935)
  • Variations on “America” (1891)
    • for Organ (original version)
    • for Piano (arr. Nina Deutsch)
    • for Orchestra (arr. by William Schuman)
    • for Military Band (arr. by W. Rhoads)
  • Sonata for Violin & Piano, No. 3
  • 27 Studies for piano, 8 lost
    • No. 6, 7, 21, 23

Albums:

Ives: Orchestral Works, Vol. 1

Ives: Orchestral Works, Vol. 2

Ives: Orchestral Works, Vol. 3

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Summery:

Charles Edward Ives (Oct. 20, 1874 – May 19, 1954), Composer
American; 20century era; Modernism
Ives was an American modernist composer. He is one of the first American composers of international renown, though his music was largely ignored during his life, and many of his works went unperformed for many years. Over time, he came to be regarded as an “American original”. He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.

#charlesives #americancomposer #20thcenturycomposer #modernistcomposer #maestro68dotcom


Baldassare Galuppi

Composer: Baldassare Galuppi
Date of Birth: 18 October 1706
Date of Death: 3 January 1785
Nationality: 🇮🇹 Italian
Period/Era/Style: Baroque/Classical Transition (Early Galante)
Contribution(s): Galuppi was an Italian composer, born on the island of Burano in the Venetian Republic. He belonged to a generation of composers, including Christoph Willibald Gluck, Domenico Scarlatti, and C. P. E. Bach, whose works are emblematic of the prevailing galant style that developed in Europe throughout the 18th century. He achieved international success, spending periods of his career in Vienna, London and Saint Petersburg, but his main base remained Venice, where he held a succession of leading appointments.

Biography: In his early career Galuppi made a modest success in opera seria, but from the 1740s, together with the playwright and librettist Carlo Goldoni, he became famous throughout Europe for his comic operas in the new dramma giocoso style. To the succeeding generation of composers he was known as “the father of comic opera”. Some of his mature opere serie, for which his librettists included the poet and dramatist Metastasio, were also widely popular.

Throughout his career Galuppi held official positions with charitable and religious institutions in Venice, the most prestigious of which was maestro di cappella at the Doge’s chapel, St Mark’s Basilica. In these various capacities he composed a large amount of sacred music. He was also highly regarded as a virtuoso performer on and composer for keyboard instruments.

In the latter half of the 19th century, Galuppi’s music was largely forgotten outside of Italy, and Napoleon’s invasion of Venice in 1797 resulted in Galuppi’s manuscripts being scattered around Western Europe, and in many cases, destroyed or lost. Galuppi’s name persists in the English poet Robert Browning’s 1855 poem “A Toccata of Galuppi’s”, but this has not helped maintain the composer’s work in the general repertoire. Some of Galuppi’s works were occasionally performed in the 200 years after his death, but it was not until the last years of the 20th century that his compositions were extensively revived in live performance and on recordings.

More information on Wikipedia: Biography   |   Early years   |   London and return to Venice   |   Saint Petersburg   |   Later years

Playlists

  • Complete Harpsichord Concertos
    • Harpsichord Concerto in C major
    • Harpsichord Concerto in Eb major
    • Harpsichord Concerto in G major
    • Harpsichord Concerto in F major
  • Cembalo Sonatas Nos. 1 – 11
  • Toccata in fa maggiore
  • L’Olimpiade: Gemo in un punto, e fremo

Albums

Complete Piano Sonatas: Vol. 1
Complete Piano Sonatas: Vol. 2
Complete Piano Sonatas: Vol. 3
La Clemenza di Tito

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Summery:

Baldassare Galuppi (Oct. 18, 1706 – Jan. 03, 1785
🇮🇹 Italian; Baroque/Classical Transition (Early Galante); Opera Composer
Galuppi was an Italian composer, born on the island of Burano in the Venetian Republic. He belonged to a generation of composers, including Christoph Willibald Gluck, Domenico Scarlatti, and C. P. E. Bach, whose works are emblematic of the prevailing galante style that developed in Europe throughout the 18th century. He achieved international success, spending periods of his career in Vienna, London and Saint Petersburg, but his main base remained Venice, where he held a succession of leading appointments.

#baldassaregaluppi #italiancomposer #baroquecomposer #baroqueclassicaltransition #galantestylemusic #maestro68dotcom

 

Heinrich Schütz


Birth Name:
Heinrich Schütz
Date of Birth: October 18 [O.S. October 8], 1585
Date of Death: November 06, 1672
Discipline/Occupation(s): Composer, Organist
Nationality: German
Period/Era/Style: Baroque
Contribution(s): Schütz was a German composer and organist, generally regarded as the most important German composer before Johann Sebastian Bach, as well as one of the most important composers of the 17th century. He wrote what is traditionally considered to be the first German opera, ‘Dafne’, performed at Torgau in 1627, the music of which has since been lost.

He is commemorated as a musician in the Calendar of Saints of some North American Lutheran churches on 28 July with Johann Sebastian Bach and George Frideric Handel.

Biography: Early life   |   Dresden (1615–1672)   |   Style   |   Works


Playlist

  • Selig sind die Toten, SWV 281
  • Jauchzet dem Herren, alle Welt, SWV 493
  • Wohl denen, die da leben, SWV 217
  • Nachdem ich lag in meinem öden Bette, SWV 451
  • Symphoniae sacrae (Book 1) (opus 6, Venice, 1629) – SWV 257 – 276
  • Symphoniae sacrae (Book 2) (opus 10, Dresden, 1647) SWV 341-367
  • Il primo libro de madrigali (first book of madrigals) (opus 1, Venice, 1611) – SWV 1-16
  • Album: Sacred Psalms of David
  • Album: Historia Der Auferstehung Jesu Christi SWV 50
  • Album: Cantiones Sacrae I
  • Album: Cantiones Sacrae II
  • Album: Kleiner geistlichen Concerten, Op. 8
  • Album: Schütz: Geistliche Chormusik I, Op. 11
  • Album: Schütz: Geistliche Chormusik II, Op. 11
  • Album: Schütz: St. Matthew Passion, SWV 479
  • Album: Schütz: St. Luke Passion, SWV 480
  • Album: Schütz: St. John Passion, SWV 481

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Summery:

Heinrich Schütz (October 18 [O.S. October 8], 1585 – November 06, 1672)
German; Baroque Composer, Organist
Schütz was generally regarded as the most important German composer before Johann Sebastian Bach, as well as one of the most important composers of the 17th century. He wrote what is traditionally considered to be the first German opera, ‘Dafne’, performed at Torgau in 1627, the music of which has since been lost. He is commemorated as a musician in the Calendar of Saints of some North American Lutheran churches on 28 July with Johann Sebastian Bach and George Frideric Handel.
Link: https://wp.me/p9cLhb-wf
#heinrichschutz #germancomposer #baroqueconposer #maestro68dotcom


 

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