Roger Quilter


Composer: Roger Cuthbert Quilter
Date of Birth: 01 November 1877
Date of Death: 21 September 1953
Nationality: English
Period/Era/Style: 20th Century
Contribution(s): Quilter was an English composer, known particularly for his songs. Born at Hove, Sussex (a commemorative blue plaque is on the house at 4 Brunswick Square), Quilter was a younger son of Sir William Quilter, 1st Baronet, a wealthy noted landowner, politician and art collector.

Biography: Roger Quilter was educated first in the preparatory school at Farnborough. He then moved to Eton College and later became a fellow-student of Percy Grainger, Cyril Scott and H. Balfour Gardiner at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt, where he studied for almost five years under the guidance of the German professor of composition Iwan Knorr. Quilter belonged to the Frankfurt Group, a circle of composers who studied at the Hoch Conservatory in the late 1890s. His reputation in England rests largely on his songs and on his light music for orchestra, such as his Children’s Overture, with its interwoven nursery rhyme tunes, and a suite of music for the play Where the Rainbow Ends. He is noted as an influence on several English composers, including Peter Warlock.

In November 1936, Quilter’s opera Julia was presented at Covent Garden by the British Music Drama Opera Company under the direction of Vladimir Rosing.

Quilter enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with the tenor Gervase Elwes until the latter’s death in 1921. As a homosexual, he found it difficult to cope with some of the pressures which he felt were imposed upon him, and eventually deteriorated into mental illness after the loss of his nephew Arnold Guy Vivian during the Second World War.

He died at his home in St John’s Wood, London, a few months after celebrations to mark his 75th birthday, and was buried in the family vault at St Mary’s Church, Bawdsey, Suffolk.

Songs

Roger Quilter’s output of songs, more than one hundred in total, added to the canon of English art song that is still sung today. Among the most popular are “Love’s Philosophy”, “Fair House of Joy”, “Come Away Death”, “Go, Lovely Rose”, “Weep You No More”, “By the Sea”, and his setting of “O Mistress Mine”. Quilter’s setting of verses from the Tennyson poem “Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal” is one of his earliest songs but is nonetheless characteristic of the later, mature style.

He also published the Arnold Book of Old Songs, a collection of 16 folk and traditional songs to new accompaniments, dedicated to his nephew Arnold Guy Vivian.


Playlist: The Best of Roger Quilter


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Roger Quilter (Nov. 01, 1877 – Sep. 21, 1953) – English, 20th century composer
Quilter was an English composer, known particularly for his songs. Born at Hove, Sussex (a commemorative blue plaque is on the house at 4 Brunswick Square), Quilter was a younger son of Sir William Quilter, 1st Baronet, a wealthy noted landowner, politician and art collector.
#rogerquilter #englishcomposer #20thcenturycomposer #songcomposer #maestro68dotcom

 

Charles Ives


Name: Charles Edward Ives
Date of Birth: October 20, 1874
Date of Death: May 19, 1954
Discipline/Occupation(s): Composer
Nationality: American
Period/Era/Style: Romantic/20th Century – Modernism
Contribution(s): Ives was an American modernist composer. He is one of the first American composers of international renown, though his music was largely ignored during his life, and many of his works went unperformed for many years. Over time, he came to be regarded as an “American original”. He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.

Sources of Ives’ tonal imagery are hymn tunes and traditional songs, the town band at holiday parade, the fiddlers at Saturday night dances, patriotic songs, sentimental parlor ballads, and the melodies of Stephen Foster.

Biography: Biography   |   Reception   |   Compositions   |   Politics


Playlist

  • Symphony No. 1 in D minor (1898-1902)
  • Symphony No. 2 (1897-1902, revised 1910)
  • Symphony No. 3: The Camp Meeting (1901-1904, rev. 1911)
  • Symphony No. 4 (1916)
  • A Symphony: New England Holidays (1919)
  • Universe Symphony (completed by L. Austin)
  • The Unanswered Question (1908, rev. 1935)
  • Variations on “America” (1891)
    • for Organ (original version)
    • for Piano (arr. Nina Deutsch)
    • for Orchestra (arr. by William Schuman)
    • for Military Band (arr. by W. Rhoads)
  • Sonata for Violin & Piano, No. 3
  • 27 Studies for piano, 8 lost
    • No. 6, 7, 21, 23

Albums:

Ives: Orchestral Works, Vol. 1

Ives: Orchestral Works, Vol. 2

Ives: Orchestral Works, Vol. 3

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Charles Edward Ives (Oct. 20, 1874 – May 19, 1954), Composer
American; 20century era; Modernism
Ives was an American modernist composer. He is one of the first American composers of international renown, though his music was largely ignored during his life, and many of his works went unperformed for many years. Over time, he came to be regarded as an “American original”. He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.

#charlesives #americancomposer #20thcenturycomposer #modernistcomposer #maestro68dotcom


Herbert Howells


Birth Name: Herbert Norman Howells
Date of Birth: 17 October 1892
Date of Death: 23 February 1983
Discipline/Occupation(s): composer, organist, and teacher
Nationality: English
Period/Era/Style: Early 20th Century
Contribution(s): Howells was an English composer, organist, and teacher, most famous for his large output of Anglican church music

Biography: Howells was born in Lydney, Gloucestershire, the youngest of the six children of Oliver Howells, a plumber, painter, decorator and builder, and his wife Elizabeth. His father played the organ at the local Baptist church, and Herbert himself showed early musical promise, first deputising for his father, and then moving at the age of eleven to the local Church of England parish church as choirboy and unofficial deputy organist.

The Howells family’s risky financial situation came to a head when Oliver filed for bankruptcy in September 1904, when Herbert was nearly 12. This was a deep humiliation in a small community at the time and one from which Howells never fully recovered. Financially assisted by a member of the family of Charles Bathurst, 1st Viscount Bledisloe who had taken an interest in the budding musician, Howells began music lessons in 1905 with Herbert Brewer, the organist of Gloucester Cathedral, and at sixteen became his articled pupil at the Cathedral alongside Ivor Novello and Ivor Gurney. The latter became a close friend, the pair going on long walks through the Gloucestershire countryside discussing their shared love of music and English literature.

Another formative experience for the young Howells was the premiere in September 1910 at the Gloucester Three Choirs Festival of Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis. Howells liked to relate in after years how Vaughan Williams sat next to him for the remainder of the concert and shared his score of Edward Elgar’s The Dream of Gerontius with the awestruck aspiring composer. Both Vaughan Williams and the Tudor composers of which Tallis was one profoundly influenced Howells’ later work.

Study at the Royal College of Music

In 1912, following the example of Ivor Gurney, Howells moved to London to study at the Royal College of Music, where his teachers included Charles Villiers Stanford, Hubert Parry and Charles Wood. Among Howells’ contemporaries in the student body were Gurney, Arthur Bliss and Arthur Benjamin.

Howells blossomed in what he considered the “cosy family” atmosphere of the College, and his Mass in the Dorian Mode was performed at Westminster Cathedral under R.R. Terry within weeks of his arrival. For the most part, however, his music at this time was orchestral; works included a piano concerto, withdrawn after its first performance, a light orchestral suite, The B’s, portraying his friends at the college, and the Three Dances for violin and orchestra. More typical of the works with which Howells was later to be associated were his earliest important compositions for organ, the first set of Psalm Preludes (1915–16) and the first of the op. 17 Rhapsodies.

Howells’ promise seemed likely to be cut short in 1915 when he was diagnosed with Graves’ disease and given six months to live. His poor health prevented him from being conscripted in World War I, arguably preserving him from the worse fate awaiting Gurney and others of his friends and contemporaries. At St Thomas’ Hospital he was given the previously untried treatment of radium injections in the neck, administered twice a week over a period of two years. For much of this time Howells travelled between London for treatment and Lydney where he was nursed by his mother. He was nonetheless still able to compose and in 1916 produced the first work of his maturity. The Piano Quartet in A minor, dedicated to “the hill at Chosen and Ivor Gurney who knows it” was in the following year one of the first works published under the auspices of the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust. In the following year Howells became assistant organist at Salisbury Cathedral, but only held the post for a few months, finding the repeated journeys to London for treatment too difficult. Friends then arranged for a grant from the Carnegie Trust, which paid for Howells to assist R.R. Terry in editing the voluminous Latin Tudor repertoire that Terry and his choir were reviving at Westminster Cathedral. The work provided Howells with a comfortable incom and enabled him to absorb the English Renaissance style which he loved and would evoke in his own music. His first significant works for choir, the Three Carol-Anthems (Here is the Little DoorA Spotless Rose and Sing Lullaby) were written around this time.


Playlist

  • Hymnus Paradisi
  • Stabat Mater
  • Requiem
  • Piano Quartet in A minor, Op. 21
  • Phantasy String Quartet, Op. 25
  • Rhapsodic Quintet, Op. 31
  • Elegy for Viola, String Qusrtet and String Orchestra
  • Suite for Orchestra
  • Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 4
  • Piano Concerto No, 2 in C major, Op. 39
  • Penguinski
  • Concerto for Strings
  • Elegy, Op. 15 for Viola and Orchestra
  • First Suite
  • Fantasia for Cello and Orchestra

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Herbert Norman Howells (Oct. 17, 1892 – Feb. 23, 1983)
English; composer, organist, and teacher; 20th Century
Howells was an English composer, organist, and teacher, most famous for his large output of Anglican church music.
Link: https://wp.me/p9cLhb-xL
#herberthowells #englishcomposer #20thcenturycomposer #maestro68dotcom


Karol Szymanowski


Birth Name: Karol Maciej Szymanowski
Date of Birth: 03 October 1882
Date of Death: 29 March 1937
Occupation(s): composer, pianist
Nationality: Polish
Period/Era/Style: 20th Century
Contribution(s): Szymanowski was a Polish composer and pianist, the most celebrated Polish composer of the early 20th century. He is considered a member of the late 19th-/early 20th-century modernist movement Young Poland and widely viewed as one of the greatest Polish composers.

The early works show the influence of the late Romantic German school as well as the early works of Alexander Scriabin, as exemplified by his Étude Op. 4 No. 3 and his first two symphonies. Later, he developed an impressionistic and partially atonalstyle, represented by such works as the Third Symphony and his Violin Concerto No. 1. His third period was influenced by the folk music of the Polish Górale people, including the ballet Harnasie, the Fourth Symphony, and his sets of Mazurkas for piano. King Roger, composed between 1918-1924, remains the most popular opera by Szymanowski. His other significant works include opera HagithSymphony No. 2The Love Songs of Hafiz, and Stabat Mater.

He was awarded the highest national honors, including the Officer’s Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta, the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland and other distinctions, both Polish and foreign.

Biography:   Life   |   Influences   |   Works   Recognition


Playlist

  • Preludes (9), Op. 1
  • Violin sonata in D minor, Op. 9
  • Concerto Overture in E major, Op. 12
  • Fantasy for Piano in C mjaor, Op. 14
  • Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 15
  • String Quartet No. 1 in C major, Op. 37
  • Stabat Mater, Op. 54
  • Masques (Masks), 3 Pieces for Piano, Op. 34
  • Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 35
  • Symphony No. 4 “Symphonie concertante”, Op. 60
  • Symphony No. 3 (Song of the Night), Op. 27
  • Violin Concerto No. 2, Op. 61
  • Piano Sonata No. 2, Op. 21
  • Harnasie, Op. 55 for tenor, mixed chorus and orchestra

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Karol Szymanowski (Oct. 03, 1882 – Mar. 29, 1937)
🇵🇱 Polish; 20th Century; Composer, Pianist
Szymanowski was a Polish composer and pianist, the most celebrated Polish composer of the early 20th century. He is considered a member of the late 19th-/early 20th-century modernist movement Young Poland and widely viewed as one of the greatest Polish composers.
Link: https://wp.me/p9cLhb-wT
#szymanowski #karolszymanowski #polishcomposer #20thcenturycomposer #maestro68dotcom


 

George Gershwin


Full Name:
George Jacob Gershwin
Date of Birth: September 26, 1898
Date of Death: July 11, 1937
Nationality: 🇺🇸 American
Period/Era/Style: 20th Century
Contribution(s): Gershwin was an American composer and pianist. Gershwin’s compositions spanned both popular and classical genres, and his most popular melodies are widely known. Among his best-known works are the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue (1924) and An American in Paris (1928) as well as the opera Porgy and Bess (1935).

Gershwin studied piano under Charles Hambitzer and composition with Rubin Goldmark, Henry Cowell and Joseph Brody. He began his career as a song plugger, but soon started composing Broadway theatre works with his brother Ira Gershwin and Buddy DeSylva. He moved to Paris intending to study with Nadia Boulanger, who refused him, where he began to compose An American in Paris. After returning to New York City, he wrote Porgy and Bess with Ira and the author DuBose Heyward. Initially a commercial failure, Porgy and Bess is now considered one of the most important American operas of the twentieth century.

Gershwin moved to Hollywood and composed numerous film scores until his death in 1937 from glioblastoma multiforme, a malignant brain tumor.

Gershwin’s compositions have been adapted for use in many films and for television, and several became jazz standards recorded in many variations. Many celebrated singers and musicians have performed his songs.

Biography from Wikipedia: Ancestors   |   Early life   |   Tin Pan Alley, 1913-1931   |   Europe and classical music, 1924-1928   |   New York, 1929-1935   |   Last years, 1936-37   |   Illness and death


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Dmitriy Shostakovich*


Birth Name: Dmitriy Dmitrievich Shostakovich
Date of Birth: 25 September 1906
Date of Death: 09 August 1975
Occupation(s):
Nationality: Soviet/Russian
Period/Era/Style: 20th Century
Contribution(s): Shostakovich was a Russian composer and pianist. He is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century.
Biography: Shostakovich achieved fame in the Soviet Union under the patronage of Soviet chief of staff Mikhail Tukhachevsky, but later had a complex and difficult relationship with the government. Nevertheless, he received accolades and state awards and served in the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR (1947–1962) and the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union (from 1962 until his death).

A polystylist, Shostakovich developed a hybrid voice, combining a variety of different musical techniques into his works. His music is characterized by sharp contrasts, elements of the grotesque, and ambivalent tonality; the composer was also heavily influenced by the neo-classical style pioneered by Igor Stravinsky, and (especially in his symphonies) by the late Romanticism associated with Gustav Mahler.

Shostakovich’s orchestral works include 15 symphonies and six concerti. His chamber output includes 15 string quartets, a piano quintet, two piano trios, and two pieces for string octet. His solo piano works include two sonatas, an early set of preludes, and a later set of 24 preludes and fugues. Other works include three operas, several song cycles, ballets, and a substantial quantity of film music; especially well known is The Second Waltz, Op. 99, music to the film The First Echelon (1955–1956), as well as the suites of music composed for The Gadfly.

Biography from Wikipedia: Early life   |   Early career   |   First denunciation   |   Withdrawal of the Fourth Symphony   |   Fifth Symphony and return to favour   |   Second World War   |   Second denunciation   |   Joining the Party   |    Later life


Playlist:

  • Symphonies (15)
  • Piano Concertos (2)
  • Violin Concertos (2)
  • Cello Concertos (2)
  • Suites (15a, 22a, 27a, 30a, 32a, …

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Václav Nelhýbel


Birth Name: Václav Nelhýbel
Date of Birth: September 24, 1919
Date of Death: March 22, 1996
Occupation(s): Teacher; Composer
Nationality: Czech-born American
Period/Era/Style: 20th Century
Contribution(s): Nelhýbel was known mainly of works for student performers. He is considered one of the most prolific composers of the 20th century.
Biography: He was born the youngest of five children in Polanka, Czechoslovakia. He received his early musical training in Prague, going to both Charles University in Prague and Prague Conservatory. In 1942 he went to Switzerland, where he studied at University of Fribourg; after 1947 he taught there. In 1957 he came to the United States, where he taught at several schools, including Lowell State College. He served as Composer-in-Residence at University of Scranton for several years until his death. The University Department of Performance Music continues to house his full collection of works.

Some of his music is for wind instruments or concert band, and most of his published music is designed for student performers. He used non-functional modal writing, pandiatonicism, and motor rhythms extensively.

Nelhybel received numerous prizes and awards for his compositions, which include a prize at the International Music and Dance Festival in Copenhagen, Denmark, for his ballet “In the Shadow of the Limetree”. In 1954, he was also awarded the first prize of the Ravitch Foundation in New York for his opera “A Legend”, and in 1978 he won an award from the Academy of Wind and Percussion Arts. Four American universities honored him with honorary doctoral degrees in music.

In addition to his works for winds, he wrote three ballets, three operas, and a symphony.

He was also a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Kappa Kappa Psi.


Playlist

  • Festivo (1968)
  • Symphonic Movement (1966)
  • Outer Space Music (1974)
  • Scherzo Concertante for horn & piano
  • Corsican Litany (1976)
  • Music for Orchestra (1967)
  • Chorlae and Danza (clarinet choir)
  • Trio for Brass
  • Metamorphosis for organ & trumpet
  • Trittico (1965)
  • Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra
  • Organ Prelude on “Mé jsi potěšni” (1989)
  • Organ Prelude on “Tisíckrát pozdravujem tebe” (1988)
  • Organ Prelude on “Svatý Václave” (1989)
  •  Suite from Bohemia (1969)

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Václav Nelhýbel
09/24/1919 – 03/22/1996
🇨🇿 Czech-born 🇺🇸 American
20th Century; Teacher; Composer
Link: https://wp.me/p9cLhb-uQ

#nelhybel #czechcomposer #americancomposer #20thcenturycomposer #concertband #bandmusic #schoolband

Amy Beach

Composer: Amy Marcy Cheney Beach
Date of Birth: September 5, 1867
Date of Death:  December 27, 1944
Nationality: American
Period/Era/Style: 20th century
Contribution(s): Beach was an American composer and pianist. She was the first successful American female composer of large-scale art music. Her “Gaelic” Symphony, premiered by the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1896, was the first symphony composed and published by an American woman. She was one of the first American composers to succeed without the benefit of European training, and one of the most respected and acclaimed American composers of her era. As a pianist, she was acclaimed for concerts she gave featuring her own music in the United States and in Germany.

Biography: Early years and musical education   |   Early career   |   Marriage   |   Rise to prominence   |   Chamber music   |   Widowhood, years in Europe   |   Return to America and later life

Compositions: Symphonic works   |   Choral works   |   Chamber music   |   Solo piano music   |   Songs

Writings: Beach was a musical intellectual who wrote for journals, newspapers, and other publications. She gave advice to young musicians and composers—especially female composers. From career to piano technique advice, Beach readily provided her opinions in articles such as, “To the Girl who Wants to Compose”, and “Emotion Versus Intellect in Music.” In 1915, she had written Music’s Ten Commandments as Given for Young Composers, which expressed many of her self-teaching principles.

Late 20th century and early 21st century revival and reception: Gaelic Symphony   |   Piano Concerto   |   Tributes and memorials

Music Examples:

Piano Concerto, Op.45 Symphony in E minor, Op.32 ‘Gaelic’ Romance for Piano and Violin, Op. 23
Dreaming, Op. 15, No. 3 Ballade, Op. 6 Theme & Variations, Op. 80

Her sacred choral works include a settings of the Te Deum first performed by the choir of men and boys at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Boston, St. Francis’s Canticle of the Sun first performed at St. Bartholomew’s in New York, and a dozen other pieces, which were extensively researched in the 1990s by Betty Buchanan, Musical Director of the Capitol Hill Choral Society in Washington, D.C.

Te Deum 3 Browning Songs, Op. 44, No. 1 3 Browning Songs, Op. 44, No. 2 3 Browning Songs, Op. 44, No. 3

She was most popular, however, for her songs. “The Year’s At the Spring” from Three Browning Songs, Op. 44 is perhaps Beach’s most well-known work. Despite the volume and popularity of the songs during her lifetime, no single-composer song collection of Beach’s works exists.

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Eric Coates

Composer: Eric Francis Harrison Coates
Date of Birth: 27 August 1886
Date of Death: 21 December 1957
Nationality: English
Period/Era/Style: 20th century
Contribution(s): Coates was an English composer of light music and a viola player.

Biography: Eric Coates was born in Hucknall in Nottinghamshire. His father was William Harrison Coates (d. 1935) who was a surgeon, and his mother was Mary Jane Gwynne, hailing from Usk in Monmouthshire. After studying at home with a governess, Eric enrolled (1906) at the Royal Academy of Music in London, where he received viola lessons from Lionel Tertis and studied composition with Frederick Corder. From 1910 he played in the Queen’s Hall Orchestra under Henry J. Wood, becoming principal violist in 1912, “… which post I held for seven years,” he said, speaking in a 1948 BBC radio interview, “until, I regret to say, I was dismissed through sending deputies to take my place when I was conducting my works elsewhere. Henry Wood little knew what a great help he had been to me by dispensing with my services, for from that day I never touched my viola again and was able to devote all my time to my writing.”

In February 1913 he married Phyllis Marguerite Black (1894-1982). He had an early success with the overture The Merrymakers (1922), but more popular was the London Suite (1933). The last movement of this, “Knightsbridge”, was used by the BBC to introduce its radio programme In Town Tonight. Amongst his early champions was Sir Edward Elgar.

Coates’s autobiography, Suite in Four Movements, was published in 1953. He died in Chichester in 1957 aged 71, having suffered a stroke and was cremated at the Golders Green Crematorium. His son, Austin Coates (1922–1997), was a writer who lived much of his life in Asia.

Eric Coates was not related to Albert Coates, the contemporary conductor and composer.

Works

Coates’s music, with its simple and memorable melodies, proved particularly effective for theme music. As well as “Knightsbridge”, the BBC also used Calling All Workers (1940) as the theme for the radio programme Music While You Work, and By the Sleepy Lagoon (1930) is still used to introduce the long-running radio programme Desert Island Discs. Coates’ “Halcyon Days”, the first movement of the suite The Three Elizabeths, was used as the theme to the popular 1967 BBC TV series The Forsyte Saga, although he received no credit. This piece was originally written in the early 1940s. It was later used as a celebration of the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. It has had a recent resurgence in popularity, featuring on a number of CDs.

Coates also wrote a number of pieces that were used as television start-up music: the BBC Television March (for BBC-TV), was used daily from 1946 to the end of 1958 and occasionally from then until 1960, the Rediffusion March (written as Music Everywhere; for Associated-Rediffusion, from 1956 to 1957), Sound and Vision (for ATV in London from 1955 to 1968 and in the Midlands from 1956 to 1971), and the South Wales and the West Television March (for TWW from 1958 to 1968).

Coates is also well known for his contribution to the film score for The Dam Busters (1955); he composed the famous main title march. He was unwilling to write the entire score when asked by the film’s producers, but warmed to the idea of writing a signature march around which the rest of the film’s score was based – in fact, he submitted a piece that he had recently completed, so the famous Dam Busters March was not itself composed with the film in mind. The final film score was completed by Leighton Lucas.

His songs, some with lyrics by Arthur Conan Doyle and Fred E. Weatherly, are less well remembered, despite their initial success. He wrote some thirty songs before turning his attention to orchestral works.

Miniature Suite was the first of many orchestral works by Coates. It was written in 1911, and consists of three movements – Children’s Dance, Intermezzo and Scene du Bal.

Coates made a number of 78 rpm recordings of his music, initially for The British Columbia label and then for Decca Records (released in the U.S. on the London Records label). He recorded his London Suite and London Again Suite for Columbia. Some of his recordings were later issued on LP and CD. From the surviving recordings, it is clear that he was a very competent conductor, who benefited from advances in high fidelity recording.

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Rebecca Clarke

Rebecca Clarke (27 August 1886 – 13 October 1979) was an English classical composer and violist best known for her chamber music featuring the viola. She was born in Harrow and studied at the Royal Academy of Music and Royal College of Music in London, later becoming one of the first female professional orchestral players. Stranded in the United States at the outbreak of World War II, she settled permanently in New York City and married composer and pianist James Friskin in 1944. Clarke died at her home in New York at the age of 93.

Although Clarke’s output was not large, her work was recognized for its compositional skill and artistic power. Some of her works have yet to be published (and many were only recently been published); those that were published in her lifetime were largely forgotten after she stopped composing. Scholarship and interest in her compositions revived in 1976. The Rebecca Clarke Society was established in 2000 to promote the study and performance of her music.

Clarke was an English classical composer and violist best known for her chamber music featuring the viola.

Biography: Early life    |    Later life and marriage   |   Music   |   Rebecca Clarke Society   |   Selected works

Composer: Rebecca Clarke
Date of Birth: 26 August 1886
Date of Death: 13 October 1979
Nationality: English/American
Period/Era/Style: 20th-century


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Chamber Works Vocal Works

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